How to Apply for Financial Aid

Financial aid awards cover one academic year only. Students must reapply each year for financial aid for the following academic year. For financial aid purposes the academic calendar begins in the fall.

U.S. Citizens or Eligible Noncitizens

(International students should see the Financial Aid for International Students section.)

1. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

The first step in applying for financial aid is to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid at www.fafsa.gov for the appropriate academic year. New students do not have to wait until an admissions application is on file to complete the FAFSA; however, students must be accepted in order to receive a financial aid eligibility letter. Students are encouraged to file the FAFSA by March 1, and may file as early as October of the year prior to the academic year they plan to attend. The FAFSA requests financial information from two years prior to the academic year to which the student is applying. To ensure accuracy of information, applicants are encouraged to utilize the IRS Data Retrieval Tool to transfer tax information from the IRS site to the FAFSA.

2. Verification and Estimated Tax Information

If a student's FAFSA is selected for verification, the student must submit a verification worksheet to the Financial Aid Office, accompanied by requested documentation.

3. Financial Aid Eligibility Letter

Once the Financial Aid Office has received all the necessary documents and the student has been accepted into a degree program, the student will be directed to MyNaropa to view the aid eligibility letter listing the types and amounts of aid for which they are eligible. Additional steps for receiving the aid are included in the Financial Aid Checklist on MyNaropa.

The Financial Aid Office is required by law to report students to the Office of the Inspector General and/or local law enforcement officials if it is suspected that information has been misreported and/or altered for the purpose of increasing financial aid eligibility or fraudulently obtaining federal funds.

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